Go to www.poormagazine.orgPrograms and Seminars

UPCOMING SEMINARS — September, 24 2013

PeopleSkooL at The Race, Poverty, Media Justice Institute 2013 Fall Class Schedule

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Classes begin Tuesday, September 24th
ALL experience levels welcome! no experience neccessary! 

Schedule for Poverty Skolaz-

Tuesdays - PeopleSkool @ SF Campus –PeopleSkool @ SF Campus- 2940 16th st #301 SF

  • 3-5pm- Revolutionary Radio-poor people-led, indigenous people-led, radio workshop creating our own "We-search", story and investigation for radio production on PNN radio and beyond.
  • 5-6:30pm Revolutioanry Journalism-Revolutionary Blogs- on-line journalism and basic investigation journalism and interviewing techniques, story writing, creative writing and poetry journalism workshop
  • 6:30- Dinner
  • 6:00 Community Newsroom once a month - 1st tuesday of the month- (Mandatory for students)
  • 7-8:30 Dismantlin' the Plantation From Skool to Spirit- Theather of the POOR-#101 Deconstructing the Plantation system that landless poor and indigenous peoples are oppressed under and all people are enmeshed in. All the poverty, migrante, indigenous, disabled, youth and elder skolaz will be teaching on and speaking on this power-FUL thesis through theatre, poetry, prayer and moving to collective liberation.

Schedule for Race, Poverty, Media justice Institute -Mentees (peoples with race, class and/or akademik privilege)-

Tuesdays - PeopleSkool @ SF Campus –PeopleSkool @ SF Campus- 2940 16th st #301 SF

  • 1:-2:30pm- Poverty Skolarship Intensive
  • 2:30 -5pm-(flexible time possible- can be arranged at other times) Mentee support
  • 5-6:30 Revolutionary Blogging - Revolutionary Blogs- on-line journalism and basic investigation journalism and interviewing techniques, story writing, creative writing and poetry journalism workshop
  • 7-8:30 Dismantlin' the Plantation

POOR magazine is a poor people led/indigenous people led, grassroots, non–profit, arts organization that is dedicated to providing extreme media access, education and art to communities of color struggling with poverty, racism, disability, immigration/migration, and criminalization in the bay area and beyond.

PeopleSkool at The Race, Poverty, Media Justice Institute is focused on teaching non–colonizing, community–based and community–led media, art and organizing with the goals of creating access for silenced voices, preserving and de–gentrifying rooted communities of color and re–framing the debate on poverty, homelessness, disability, migration, incarceration and race locally and globally.

Find out the registration process and fee

Download application form for




**OTHER ONE AND TWO DAY SEMINARS OFFERED IN THE SUMMER:

  • Health and the poor body of color
  • Akademik in Residence: Jose Cuellar – with Ethnic and Community Studies
  • Resistance in Film Series

All workshops are led by Poverty Scholars who have survived poverty, homelessness, violence, profiling, immigration, disability, incarceration, police harassment, domestic violence, etc..




PAST SEMINAR

PeopleSkooL

February 5, 2013

February 1, 2011

September 14, 2010

January 28, 2010

Crumbling the Myth of The Gift — Deconstructing Donor Denial & Dismantling The Non–Profit Industrial Complex... One outcome at a Time!

June 19–21, 2009

POOR Magazine mural

June 19, 6–7:30pm Juneteenth Opening Ceremony/Performance
RPMJ Resistance in Film Series 7:30–9pm
June 20, 10am–5pm Change sessions– RPMJ Resistance in Film Series 6–9pm
June 21, 10am–4pm Change sessions & Closing Ceremony

A three day intensive seminar, "Revolutionary Change Session" offered by the Race, Poverty and Media Justice Institute (RPMJ) at POOR Magazine. This session is designed for conscious folk with race, class and/or education privilege from across the globe who are interested in exploring. implementing and practicing truly revolutionary expressions of giving, equity sharing and change–making.

How is wealth distributed across the Globe? Who actively decides how and where resources go? And how does one actually de–fund the Non–Profit Industrial Complex. As conscious peoples questioning, working on or actively participating in the just redistribution of resources, it is time to practice a new model of equity– sharing, financial decision–making and resource division.

The Revolutionary Change Session is a three day intensive moment in herstory aimed at cleansing, shaking, enervating, reinvigorating, de–bullshit–izing, un–entangling, bringing you to back to your own truth/spirit and real–ness, life–changing session.

We deconstruct the lies intrinsic in philanthropy, reconstruct the truths of humanity, care–giving, sharing and community and practice a new form of equity sharing we at POOR Magazine call, Revolutionary Giving.

About Revolutionary Giving:

POOR Magazine is proud to introduce a solution to the Non–Profit Industrial Complex and the exclusionary hierarchy of U.S. philanthropy; Revolutionary Giving. As an indigenous people led/poor people led non–profit, grassroots, arts organization we have long been critical of the classist, racist, model of philanthropy that perpetuates the deserving versus undeserving notion of caregiving, service provision and charity.

This notion turns people's pain and struggle into a product, pits the poor against the poorest and ultimately inhibits, silences and destroys the spirit, culture, art, language, and voices of poor people, indigenous people, and cultures of color across the globe. This damaging notion is pervasive in institutions and systems in the US, from the Prison Industrial Complex to the Non–Profit Industrial Complex, from the education system to the welfare System, it is how these harmful systems can continue to operate, it is how these systems can "profit" from our poverty without ever truly working towards change, access to equity, resources, civil, economic and human rights for all.

From POOR Magazine's perspective, we believe that giving and donating for the giver or donor is not a privilege, an option, or a nice idea, rather, it is a duty. A duty of people with class and/or race privilege, to give their time, their surplus income, their equity, and/or their support, towards change for people struggling with poverty in the US and across the globe.




A SAMPLE Of 2008–09 CORE SEMINARS

Deconstructing Case Management; Reconstructing Real Service Provision

This session explores several aspects of the Western psychological notion of “independence and individuation” and how these concepts shape our frame of sanity and pathology in the ways that individuals, families and communities are evaluated, pathologized, criminalized and treated. In contrast we will present indigenous values of interdependence as a value and model for evaluation, healing and caregiving. Finally this session will present new models of treatment through art, social justice and restoration for families, individuals and elders in poverty.

  • A HISTORICAL AND HERSTORICAL REVIEW OF POVERTY, RACISM, DISABILITY, CRIMINALIZATION AND SERVICE PROVISION
  • SEPARATION VERSUS RESTORATION: CONFRONTING THE WESTERN MODEL OF FAMILY CRISIS TREATMENT AND INSTITUTING CARE–GIVING AND HEALING

It Takes a Village to Raise a Classroom: Multi–generational teaching and learning in a 21st Century classroom.

How do we transform the rigid, linear, mono–generational classroom into a multi–generational, multi–cultural , multi–lingual, space of inclusion, eldership and community where parents and community elders are valued for their scholarship, their languages, cultures and leadership. Conversely, how do we use art and media to promote student and family leadership and community consciousness that not only cultivates powerful teaching and learning but sustains the community around the school in the face of violence, gentrification, border fascism, redevelopment,homelessness and poverty.

  • Cultivating Parent and Student Scholars in the classroom
  • How to create a Multi–generational classroom
  • Integrating the Arts and Media as a learning and organizing tool
  • Creating the Indigenous Classroom: Genuine integration of our indigenous languages and cultures through curriculum development, project–based teaching and art
  • Saving our communities/Healing our students: Sustaining our communities in the face of poverty , violence and gentrification

Default Colonizers, 21st Century Missionaries and The Fetishization Of Global Poverty and Activism

In this session we look at the role of US to global “activism”, media production and organizing and the transubstantive errors of cross–class, cross–cultural activism, media production and development.

  • CONNECTING THE GLOBAL TO LOCAL POVERTY DOTS – REVISIONING LOCAL TO GLOBAL ORGANIZING
  • ANALYZING THE MYTHS/PRIVILEGE OF TRAVEL

Challenging Academia, Media and Research

The worlds of academia, research and media has a rigid notion of who should be heard, what is a scholar and what is considered a valid form of data collection, media production and research. In this section, the poverty, race, disability, youth, migrant and indigenous scholars challenge the rigid concept of the canon, of scholarship itself and who should be heard and recognized.

  • THE MYTH OF OBJECTIVITY: THE REVOLUTION BEGINS WITH  “I”
  • LANGUAGE DOMINATION AND THE ROOTS OF LINGUISTIC PRIVILEGE IN MEDIA , POLICY, RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTION
  • JOURNALISM AS VOYEURISM: THE PRIVILEGE OF AUTHORSHIP, BY–LINE AND THE ROLE OF WRITER FACILITATION
  • POETRY, HIP HOP AND ART AS MEDIA: EXPANDING OUR NOTIONS OF JOURNALISM AND MEDIA PRODUCTION
  • CHALLENGING ACADEMIA; REDEFINING THE CANON: POVERTY, RACE, DISABILITY, YOUTH, ELDER, MIGRANT AND INDIGENOUS SCHOLARSHIP #101
  • TRASH, DIRT, MESS, CRAZY, STUPID: MEDIA AND ACADEMIA’S EXPLICIT AND IMPLICIT ROLE IN CRIMINALIZING POOR COMMUNITIES OF COLOR
  • RACE AND DISABILITY IN THE MEDIA

Revolutionary Fundraising and Development

How do people with resources (money, endowments, trust funds, et al) by default, get to choose who gets funded? How does the role of hundreds of years of colonization, land theft, imperialization and capitalization play into that privilege? How does the mere fact that some people have money make them default “scholars”? In this section we revision poor communities of color as scholars, donor collaborators, co–funders as well as teach new ways for people with privilege to approach truly revolutionary funding and development.

 

Registration and Fees

Leadership, Media and Arts Education for children, youth, families and individuals struggling with poverty (POVERTY SCHOLARS)